DCMI Handbook/webinars

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Contents


Upcoming webinars

July 1, 2015

OpenAIRE Guidelines: Promoting Repositories Interoperability and Supporting Open Access Funder Mandates

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 1 July 2015, 10:00am-11:15am EDT (UTC 14:00) World Clock: http://bit.ly/pprincipe)

Abstract: The OpenAIRE Guidelines for Data Source Managers provide recommendations and best practices for encoding of bibliographic information in OAI metadata. They have adopted established standards for different classes of content providers: (1) Dublin Core for textual publications in institutional and thematic repositories; (2) DataCite Metadata Kernel for research data repositories; and (3) CERIF-XML for Current Research Information Systems.

The principle of these guidelines is to improve interoperability of bibliographic information exchange between repositories, e-journals, CRIS and research infrastructures. They are a means to help content providers to comply with funders Open Access policies, e.g. the European Commission Open Access mandate in Horizon2020, and to standardize the syntax and semantics of funder/project information, open access status, links between publications and datasets. The presenters will provide an overview of the guidelines, implementation support in major platforms and tools for validation.

Presenters:

Portrait: Pedro Príncipe Pedro Príncipe

Pedro Príncipe is an information specialist at University of Minho Documentation Services (Portugal) on the Open Access Projects Office. He has worked since 2010 in the OpenAIRE projects and infrastructure, in support, helpdesk and dissemination activities. He is member of the OpenAIRE guidelines team and co-author of the OpenAIRE guidelines for data source managers.

Portrait: Jochen Schirrwagen image Jochen Schirrwagen

Jochen Schirrwagen is research fellow at Bielefeld University Library, Germany. He has worked since 2008 in the knowledge infrastructure projects DRIVER and OpenAIRE in the fields of metadata management, aggregation and contextualization. He is co-author of the OpenAIRE guidelines for data source managers and coordinates its further evolvement.


 Categories:   OpenAIRE | bibliographic information exchange  
 Webinar Type: Overview

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September 9, 2015

Implementing Linked Data in Low-Resource Conditions (RESCHEDULED)

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 17 June 2015 9 September 2015, 10:00am-11:15am EDT (UTC 14:00) World Clock: http://bit.ly/webinar-keiser)

Abstract: Opening up and linking data is becoming a priority for many data producers because of institutional requirements, or to consume data in newer applications, or simply to keep pace with current development. Since 2014, this priority has gaining momentum with the Global Open Data in Agriculture and Nutrition initiative (GODAN). However, typical small and medium-size institutions have to deal with constrained resources, which often hamper their possibilities for making their data publicly available. This webinar will be of interest to any institution seeking ways to publish and curate data in the Linked Data World.

Keizer and Caracciolo will provide an overview of bottlenecks that institutions typically face when entering the world of open and linked data, and will provide recommendations on how to proceed. They will also discuss the use of standard and linked vocabularies to produce linked data, especially in the area of agriculture. They will describe AGRISAs, a web-based resource linking agricultural datasets as an example of linked data application resulting from the collaboration of small institutions. They will also mention AgriDrupal, a Drupal distribution that supports the production and consumption of linked datasets.

Redux: An update of a webinar first presented in 2013.

Presenters:

Portrait: Johannes Keizer image Johannes Keizer

Johannes Keizer has worked for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN since 1998, primarily as head of the FAO documentation group. The bibliographic database AGRIS and the multilingual concept scheme AGROVOC were completely remodeled under his leadership. In the Office of Knowledge Exchange, Research and Extensions, he heads a staff of 20—the AIMS (Agricultural Information Management Standards and Services) team—which provides standards, tools, and advice for FAO stakeholders. The AIMS Team provides the technical backbone for the global Coherence in Information for Agricultural Research for Development (CIARD) Initiative. Through EC framework projects such as NeON, D2Science, and agINFRA, the AIMS Team has channeled the results of innovative European research into the international work of FAO to combat hunger and poverty in the world.

Portrait: Caterina Caracciolo image Caterina Caracciolo

Caterina Caracciolo, PhD, has served as a Senior Information Specialist at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) since 2006. Currently, she is responsible for the AGROVOC Concept Scheme, and participates in the GACS Working Group and the Wheat Data Interoperability Working Group (RDA). Her main interest lay in the area of semantics for data integration and sharing, with a special focus on data specific to the domains of agriculture, biodiversity, natural science and environment in the broad sense. She regularly serves on program committees for international conferences and publishes in conference proceedings and journals in the area of semantic web and information sharing in agriculture and biodiversity. She has worked in various EC-funded projects and also served as Work Package leader in the NeOn and SemaGrow projects.


 Categories:   open data | developing countries | AGRISAs | linking datasets | 
               Drupal | publishing/curating data | low-resource conditions
 Webinar Type: Innovative practices

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Past webinars


May 27, 2015

Digital Preservation Metadata and Improvements to PREMIS in Version 3.0

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 27 May 2015, 10:00am-11:15am EDT (UTC 14:00) World Clock: http://bit.ly/Webinar-Dappert)

Abstract: The PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata is the international standard for metadata to support the preservation of digital objects and ensure their long-term usability. Developed by an international team of experts, PREMIS is implemented in digital preservation projects around the world, and support for PREMIS is incorporated into a number of commercial and open-source digital preservation tools and systems. The PREMIS Editorial Committee coordinates revisions and implementation of the standard, which consists of the Data Dictionary, an XML schema, and supporting documentation.

The PREMIS Data Dictionary is currently in version 2.2. A new major release 3.0 is due out this summer. This webinar gives a brief overview over why digital preservation metadata is needed, shows examples of digital preservation metadata, shows how PREMIS can be used to capture this metadata, and illustrates some of the changes that will be available in version 3.0.

Presenter:

Portrait: Angela Dappert image Angela Dappert

Dr. Angela Dappert is Senior Research Fellow at the University of Portsmouth. She has widely researched and published on digital preservation. She has consulted for archives and libraries on digital life cycle management and policies, led and conducted research in the EU-co-funded Planets, Scape, TIMBUS, and E-ARK projects, and applied digital preservation practice at the British Library through work on digital repository implementation, digital metadata standards, digital asset registration, digital asset ingest, preservation risk assessment, planning and characterization, and data carrier stabilization. Angela holds a Ph.D. in Digital Preservation, an M.Sc. in Medical Informatics and an M.Sc. in Computer Sciences. She serves on the PREMIS Editorial Committee and the Digital Preservation Programme Board of National Records Scotland.


 Categories: PREMIS 3.0 | preservation metadata | 
 Webinar Type: Standard update

May 13, 2015

From 0 to 60 on SPARQL queries in 50 minutes

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 13 May 2015, 10:00am-11:15am EDT (UTC 14:00) World Clock: http://bit.ly/Webinar-Ethan_Gruber)

Abstract: This webinar provides an introduction to SPARQL, a query language for RDF. Users will gain hands on experience crafting queries, starting simply, but evolving in complexity. These queries will focus on coinage data in the SPARQL endpoint hosted by http://nomisma.org: numismatic concepts defined in a SKOS-based thesaurus and physical specimens from three major museum collections (American Numismatic Society, British Museum, and Münzkabinett of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin) linked to these concepts. Results generated from these queries in the form of CSV may be imported directly into Google Fusion Tables for immediate visualization in the form of charts and maps.

This webinar was first presented as a training session in the LODLAM Training Day at SemTech2014.

Presenter:

Portrait: Ethan Gruber image Ethan Gruber

Ethan Gruber is the Web and Database Developer for the American Numismatic Society (ANS). With almost ten years of experience in digital humanities and cultural heritage web development projects, Ethan is responsible for developing a new public interface for the society's collections of objects and archives. He is the chief architect of Numishare, an open-source framework for delivering coin collections online and various ANS projects which implement this software: Online Coins of the Roman Empire and Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic.


 Categories: SPARQL | Resource Description Framework (RDF) | 
 Webinar Type: Praxis

April 8, 2015 - Andreas Rauber

Approaches to Making Dynamic Data Citable: Recommendations of the RDA Working Group

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 8 April 2015, 10:00am-11:15am EDT (UTC 14:00) World Clock: http://bit.ly/Webinar-Andreas_Rauber)

Abstract: Being able to reliably and efficiently identify entire or subsets of data in large and dynamically growing or changing datasets constitutes a significant challenge for a range of research domains. In order to repeat an earlier study, to apply data from an earlier study to a new model, we need to be able to precisely identify the very subset of data used. While verbal descriptions of how the subset was created (e.g. by providing selected attribute ranges and time intervals) are hardly precise enough and do not support automated handling, keeping redundant copies of the data in question does not scale up to the big data settings encountered in many disciplines today. Furthermore, we need to be able to handle situations where new data gets added or existing data gets corrected or otherwise modified over time. Conventional approaches, such as assigning persistent identifiers to entire data sets or individual subsets or data items, are thus not sufficient.

In this webinar we will review the challenges identified above and discuss solutions that are currently elaborated within the context of the working group of the Research Data Alliance (RDA) on Data Citation: Making Dynamic Data Citeable. The approach is based on versioned and time-stamped data sources, with persistent identifiers being assigned to the time-stamped queries/expressions that are used for creating the subset of data. We will further review results from the first pilots evaluating the approach.

Presenter:

Portrait: Andreas Rauber image Andreas Rauber

Andreas Rauber is Associate Professor at the Department of Software Technology and Interactive Systems (IFS) at the Vienna University of Technology (TU-Wien). He furthermore is president of AARIT, the Austrian Association for Research in IT and a Key Researcher at Secure Business Austria (SBA-Research). He is co-chairing the RDA Working Group on Data Citation together with Ari Asmi and Dieter van Uytvanck.

He received his MSc and PhD in Computer Science from the Vienna University of Technology in 1997 and 2000, respectively. In 2001 he joined the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) in Pisa as an ERCIM Research Fellow, followed by an ERCIM Research position at the French National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Control (INRIA), at Rocquencourt, France, in 2002. From 2004-2008 he was also head of the iSpaces research group at the eCommerce Competence Center (ec3).


 Categories: Research Data Alliance (RDA) | citable dynamic data  
 Webinar Type: Overview

March 4, 2015 - Caterina Caracciolo & Armando Stellato

VocBench 2.0: A Web Application for Collaborative Development of Multilingual Thesauri

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 4 March 2015, 10:00am-11:15am EST (UTC 15:00 World Clock: http://bit.ly/DCMI-Webinar-Stellato)

Abstract: VocBench is a web-based platform for the collaborative maintenance of multilingual thesauri. VocBench is an open source project, developed in the context of a collaboration between the Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN (FAO) and the University of Rome Tor Vergata. VocBench is currently used for the maintenance of AGROVOC, EUROVOC, GEMET, the thesaurus of the Italian Senate, the Unified Astronomy Thesaurus of Harvard University, as well as other thesauri. VocBench has a strong focus on collaboration, supported by workflow management for content validation and publication. Dedicated user roles provide a clean separation of competencies, addressing different specificities ranging from management aspects to vertical competencies in content editing, such as conceptualization versus terminology editing. Extensive support for scheme management allows editors to fully exploit the possibilities of the SKOS model, as well as to fulfill its integrity constraints. VocBench has been open source software since version 2 -- open to a large community of users and institutions supporting its development with their feedback and ideas. During the webinar we will demonstrate the main features of VocBench from the point of view of users and system administrators, and explain in what way you may join the project.

Presenters:

Portrait: Caterina Caracciolo Caterina Caracciolo

Caterina Caracciolo, PhD, has served as an Information Specialist at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) since 2006. Currently, she is responsible for the AGROVOC Concept Scheme, and participates in the GACS Working Group and the Wheat Data Interoperability Working Group (RDA). Her main interest lay in the area of semantics for data integration and sharing, with a special focus on data specific to the domains of agriculture, biodiversity, natural science and environment in the broad sense. She regularly serves on program committees for international conferences and publishes in conference proceedings and journals in the area of semantic web and information sharing in agriculture and biodiversity. She has worked in various EC-funded projects and also served as Work Package leader in the NeOn and SemaGrow projects.


Portrait: Armando Stellato Armando Stellato

Armando Stellato, PhD, is Researcher at the University of Rome Tor Vergata, where he carries on research and teaching in the fields of Knowledge Representation and Knowledge Based Systems. He is author of more than 70 publications on conferences and journals in the fields of Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing and related areas and has been member of the program committees of over 30 international scientific conferences and workshops. Currently his main interests cover Architecture Design for Knowledge Based Systems, Knowledge Acquisition and Onto-Linguistic interfaces, for which he participated to several EU funded projects, such as Crossmarc, Moses, Cuspis, Diligent, Neon, INSEARCH, SCIDIP-ES, AgInfra SemaGrow. Dr. Stellato is also consultant at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations as Semantic Architect, working on all aspects related to maintenance and publication of FAO RDF vocabularies such as AGROVOC, Biotech and Journal Authority Data and on the development of VocBench, an Application for Collaborative Management of RDF Vocabularies.


Presentation slides: PDF

November 19, 2014 - Phil Barker & Lorna Campbell

The Learning Resource Metadata Initiative, describing learning resources with schema.org, and more?

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 19 November, 2014, 10:00am-11:15am EST (UTC 15:00) World Clock: http://bit.ly/1pKiCUj)

Abstract: The Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) is a collaborative initiative that aims to make it easier for teachers and learners to find educational materials through major search engines and specialized resource discovery services. The approach taken by LRMI is to extend the schema.org ontology so that educationally significant characteristics and relationships can be expressed. In this webinar, Phil Barker and Lorna M. Campbell of Cetis will introduce schema.org and present the background to LRMI, its aims and objectives, and who is involved in achieving them. The webinar will outline the technical aspects of the LRMI specification, describe some example implementations and demonstrate how the discoverability of learning resources may be enhanced. Phil and Lorna will present the latest developments in LRMI implementation, drawing on an analysis of its use by a range of open educational resource repositories and aggregators, and will report on the potential of LRMI to enhance education search and discovery services. Whereas the development of LRMI has been inspired by schema.org, the webinar will also include discussion of whether LRMI has applications beyond those of schema.org.

Presenters:

Portrait: Lorna Campbell Lorna Campbell

Lorna M Campbell has worked in the domain of open education technology and interoperability standards for over fifteen years and has contributed to the development of a number of learning resource metadata specifications. Phil and Lorna were commissioned by Creative Commons to manage the third phase of the Learning Resource Metadata Initiative. LRMI is co-led by Creative Commons and the Association of Educational Publishers (AEP)—now the 501(c)(3) arm of the Association of American Publishers.


Portrait: Phil Barker image Phil Barker

Phil Barker is a research fellow at Heriot-Watt University who has worked supporting the use of learning technology in Higher Education for twenty years. For much of this time he has worked with Lorna M. Campbell as part of Cetis. His work focuses on supporting the discovery and selection of appropriate resources, and he has contributed to the development of a number of learning resource metadata specifications. He was on the technical working group of the learning resource metadata initiative and has since worked on the third phase of LRMI promoting its uptake and use.

Presentation slides: PDF



 Categories: Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) | schema.org | search engines | markup languages
Webinar Type: Praxis



May 21, 2014 - Seth van Hooland & Ruben Verborgh

How to pick the low hanging fruits of Linked Data

Webinar Date: Wednesday, 21 May, 2014, 10:00am EDT (World Clock: 14:00 UTC http://bit.ly/1qLSeq1)

Abstract: The concept of Linked Data has gained momentum over the past few years, but the understanding and the application of its principles often remain problematic. This webinar offers a short critical introduction to Linked Data by positioning this approach within the global evolution of data modeling, allowing an understanding of the advantages but also of the limits of RDF. After this conceptual introduction, the fundamental importance of data quality in the context of Linked Data is underlined by applying data profiling techniques with the help of OpenRefine. Methods and tools for metadata reconciliation and enrichment, such as Named-Entity Recognition (NER), are illustrated with the help of the same software. This webinar will refer to case-studies with real-life data which can be re-used by participants to continue to explore OpenRefine at their own pace after the webinar. The case-studies have been developed in the context of the handbook "Linked Data for Libraries, Archives and Museums", which will be published by Facet Publishing in June 2014.

Presenters:

Portrait: Seth van Hooland Seth van Hooland

Seth van Hooland is an assistant professor at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), where he leads the Master in Information Science. After a career in the private sector for a digitization company, he obtained his PhD in information science at ULB in 2009. He is currently teaching a special course on linked data at the Information School of the University of Washington. He is also active as a consultant for both public and private organizations.


Portrait: Ruben Verborgh image Ruben Verborgh

Ruben Verborgh is a researcher in semantic hypermedia at Ghent University – iMinds, Belgium, where he obtained his PhD in computer science in 2014. He explores the connection between semantic web technologies and the web's architectural properties, with the ultimate goal of building more intelligent clients. Along the way, he has become fascinated by linked data, REST/hypermedia, web APIs and related technologies. He is the co-author of a book on OpenRefine and several publications on web-related topics in international journals.

Handout for the webinar: PDF Presentation slides: PDF

   Categories: Metadata Modeling | Transactions on Metadata | Resource Description Framework (RDF)

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